A Dark Day for the United States

Our Supreme Court ended it’s term today, and closed it’s doors on our people. Tomorrow, many school districts across our country will be faced with uncertainty…and our children will no longer be given the same opportunity to experience diversity. This is a real shame.

A few quotes from Justice Breyer’s Dissent today on the racial integration case:

Indeed, the consequences of the approach the Court takes today are serious. Yesterday, the plans under review were lawful. Today, they are not. Yesterday, the citizens of this Nation could look for guidance to this Court’s unanimous pronouncements concerning desegregation. Today, they cannot. Yesterday, school boards had available to them a full range of means to combat segregated schools. Today, they do not.

(snip)

Finally, what of the hope and promise of Brown? For much of this Nation’s history, the races remained divided. It was not long ago that people of different races drank from separate fountains, rode on separate buses, and studied in separate schools. In this Court’s finest hour, Brown v. Board of Education challenged this history and helped to change it. For Brown held out a promise. It was a promise embodied in three Amendments designed to make citizens of slaves. It was the promise of true racial equality—not as a matter of fine words on paper, but as a matter of everyday life in the Nation’s cities and schools. It was about the nature of a democracy that must work for all Americans. It sought one law, one Nation, one people, not simply as a matter of legal principle but in terms of how we actually live.

(snip)

The plurality is wrong to do so. The last half-century has witnessed great strides toward racial equality, but we have not yet realized the promise of Brown. To invalidate the plans under review is to threaten the promise of Brown. The plurality’s position, I fear, would break that promise. This is a decision that the Court and the Nation will come to regret.

I must dissent.

2016-03-21T19:29:28+00:00 Categories: Government|

About the Author:

Henry Poole co-founded CivicActions in 2004 and was appointed CEO in 2014. Henry is responsible for advising clients undertaking innovation and transformation, participates in business development, and oversees the management team.

Henry has recently advised on the turnaround of a large scale, multi-vendor DOD Drupal project as well as the launch of a new platform for the San Francisco Human Services Agency. Prior to consulting for CivicActions government clients, he advised on the launch of numerous very successful campaigns including Defective by Design for the Free Software Foundation, and 170 Million Americans for American Public Media. 170 Million Americans was launched within 30 days of kickoff, included aligning stakeholders from dozens of public media companies, and resulted in a 53% membership conversion rate on the new website.

Henry has more than 30 years experience in information technology innovation, organizational transformation and strategic management. Henry founded one of the first Internet Agencies in 1993, led a French free and open source company to outsell Redhat retail in the US in 2001, and launched the first blog for a US congressman in 2003.

Henry serves on the boards of several technology companies as well as the Free Software Foundation.